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TechEditor

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When the power is out I have wanted a wall mounted night light to replace the electric powered one here: http://heatburner.websitetoolbox.com/post/my-oil-light-collection-6775133?&trail=15
I had been using a #1 Queen Anne in a finger fount base. While the #1 worked OK, it was just too much wick and used too much fuel, so I ordered a #0 Queen Anne, antiqued finish, #2 to #1 reducer adapter and a chimney from http://www.oillampparts.com. [1_zps1d45c14b] 
L to R: #0 Queen Anne, antiqued finish, #2 to #1 reducer adapter, and a 6-1/2" chimney.
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Here is the burner with the reducer adapter installed. I cranked the adapter down quite tight so the adapter will stay with the burner.
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Here is the #0 burner installed on the glass wall mount fount. Yes I am aware the burner looks way too small for the fount. But the size allows for 4-5 nights of operation on a single fill. And this fount, unlike the finger lamp I was using for a night light, has an external fill cap so you don't have to remove the burner to fill.
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Assembly is complete and the "tuning" begins.
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The wick was trimmed to remove the fuzz.
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Here we see the #0 burner at approximately "night light" height.
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Here we see the #0 burner cranked all the way up. The fuel is Kleen Heat and as you can see, you get a large steady flame with no smoke.
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Here it is in operation. The reproduction stainless steel reflector is from http://www.oillampparts.com also. Produces exactly the amount of light at night I wanted. It is though a bear to get lit due to its small size. When you try to light it, you have to turn the wick up so high to get it to light that when it does light, you get a flame that starts outside the air dome and you get a yellow flame that extends 3 inches above the air dome. And get this, it is a stable flame with no smoke, with no chimney! Crank it down and everything is back to normal with the flame originating from the wick, not an inch above it!
Costs for the conversion assuming you have the Fount, wall bracket and reflector, as of 6/14 are: #0 Queen Anne burner, antiqued, $17.00. Collar reducer to adapt the #1 thread on the #0 burner to a #2 collar, $5.00. #0 plain chimney, 2-1/8" fitter, 3" bulge and 6-1/2" tall, $10.00. Total cost was $32.00

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After using this setup for a few months, I just became fed up with the Queen Anne burner. It is simply a Bear to get started. Turn the wick up to where it should be and it simply won't light. Turn it up until it will light and you get a flame 3" high! And this flame is not connected to the wick! It starts above the Air Deflector and continues on upward for about 2". Funny thing about this flame is it never smokes. You can leave it burning like that. No chimney, no smoke. It's just plain weird!
So I decided to try a P&A (Plume & Atwood) Eagle #0. Found a NOS burner on Ebay.
Here is the difference in design with the Queen Anne on the left and the P&A Eagle on the right.
[Burner_Comparison1_zps3uicnlpf] 
[Burner_Comparison2_zps7d5ljc0i] 
Larger burner and raised Wick Tube and a much larger Air Deflector with the P&A Eagle #0.
Once the chimney is in place, the burns are identical. However since the P&A Eagle is so much easier to light because of the larger Air Deflector, this is now my burner of choice in my night light.

All my flat wick burners are now P&A Eagles except for my #1 Finger Lamp. And I will be on the lookout of an Eagle #1.

In my opinion, for what it is worth, the Plume & Atwood burners are just superior to a Queen Anne.


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Fran365

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi Greg, your post quickened me about my collection of table lamps(6). I've never been really interested in them but have decided at least 2 have to be useful emergency lights. As I inspected mine one was labeled, on the font bottom(glass) and on the wick adjusting knob, "Lamp light farms". Are these toys? the burners don't look anything like the ones you've posted here. I also notice the wicks are sloppy in the channel they run in and have gaps both ways, I suspect this is not good. Could you recommend a good rugged portable lamp, lantern. And again, if you wish, how do you tell a toy from a good lamp/lantern. I recentley saw some very interesting older lanterns at used stuff marts, but they had been spray painted to look good, don't think you could clean them up. Fran
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Reply with quote  #4 
The Lamplight Farms are new copies of "good" burners. They are not good copies either. Pick up a vintage Eagle burner and fit it to your Fount. Install a Miles Stair wick and you are good to go. or PM me and I can set you up with some really good burners.
As far as Lanterns, either a vintage or modern Dietz is a good choice. Choose a "cold Blast" type for maximum light. I have two 1930's vintage Dietz "D-Lite" that I restored that were used on our farm up until 1943 when we got electrocuted via the Rural Electrification Act.

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Fran365

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Reply with quote  #5 
HI Greg, thanks for the info. 
larryh

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Reply with quote  #6 
Greg,

I use the very small oil lamps with the round wicks as night lights, they throw enough light to at least maneuver in the dark. I found that with regular kerosene they tended to put out way more odor than one would expect. Thus I was reluctant to use them much. However a friend from the other group saw me discussing this one day and wrote and said that he found that the bottled lamp oil or paraffin would work in them without the odor. (I think actually it was the paraffin which is very expensive around here, Ace hardware still has it in several sizes)  Any way he was right. I can run one of them for several nights on the small tanks they have and the odor is very reasonable. As a side note after complaining about how the oil was crusting over my wicks quickly making them nearly impossible to use, I have found lately that the oil I get from the same sources if now burning much like the old oil did. Hopefully they did something to make the oil more reliable again.  

Larry 
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